14 Songs from the 1980s: Examples showing how Meanspeed Music is different from the BPM List and the organization www.bpmdatabase.com


Above are pictured some of the things you can do when you input the proper number into the BPM column. You can arrange any way you want: in ascending speed order, descending speed order, reverse alphabetical order by song titles—whatever you like is possible. Very fun.
This is just the sample of 14 from iTunes’ 1980s “Soft Hits of the1980s” album. You may see though, the more you add to the BPM column, the more you can pick and choose into your PLAYLIST columns—which, of course, are the key to digital music sets. As in—you do not want to hear someone else’s mixes, or a mix someone else made “especially for you” (to their taste, usually)—you want to make you own, and so of course–best, playlist. We’re giving you the tool to do it no one else is giving you: the proper speed.

What about all the BPM programs out there, though? Can’t they scan your library and obtain the BPM automatically? Short answer: not close. I have tried many of them, and (1) nothing affiliated with iTunes may be scanned by an outside scanner, period, (2) the numbers in beats per minute that I was getting from some of the better reviewed software programs at times were simply outlandish—I was to believe, via http://www.beaTunes.com, a program where they brag about themselves so much I just can’t wait to try the program—alas—a miserable failure. Computers simply cannot figure out where the beat falls. This is an easy concept, geniuses have tried to ‘work around the problem that a computer cannot recognize a silence as a beat,’ and, noble though the effort has been, the results are always a waste of money.

Do it yourself. It’s so much more fun.

The twelve songs and artists shown above and listed below in text were listed as measured speeds only as everything else about a record–from the producer to the woman who tuned the backup guitarists backup guitar may be found online as it is. Where else can you get speed? http://www.bpmdatabase.com, who puts out speeds as “correct” where those running the site itself have not done the work—they plead for “submissions,” they plead for money, but they don’t back up the work–and has a limited selection, which is kinda good because you want good songs from which to choose—but their list is very house music oriented—great for the house DJ’s, terrible for the 40 year old who just wants to go out and run a couple of miles. You can try: http://www.bpmlist.com where you will need to pay $80 to get a look at the [work and speeds]—after you get to track the package for a week—there is no online version. Also, the “author” of the BPM List did not do and cannot and does not vouch for any speed—so here we are. Why for free? Cause we’re beyond cool. All numbers are in beat per minute and are mean speeds.

Plain

Miss You Like Crazy, Natalie Cole, 65
Hard To Say I’m Sorry, Chicago, 72
Little Jeannie, Elton John, 72
You’re The Inspiration, Chicago, 74
One Moment In Time, Whitney Houston, 78
Words Get In The Way, Gloria Estefan, 78
Eternal Flame, The Bangles, 79
What Kind Of Fool, Barbra Streisand and Barry Gibb, 79
Hard Habit To Break, Chicago, 81
No One Is To Blame, Howard Jones, 94
True, Spandau Ballet, 97
Key Largo, Bertie Higgins, 101
Any Day Now, Ronnie Milsap, 103
Too Late For Goodbyes, Julian Lennon, 123

Miss You Like Crazy, Natalie Cole, 65

Hard To Say I’m Sorry, Chicago, 72
Little Jeannie, Elton John, 72
You’re The Inspiration, Chicago, 74

One Moment In Time, Whitney Houston, 78
Words Get In The Way, Gloria Estefan, 78

Eternal Flame, The Bangles, 79
What Kind Of Fool, Barbra Streisand and Barry Gibb, 79
Hard Habit To Break, Chicago, 81

No One Is To Blame, Howard Jones, 94
True, Spandau Ballet, 97

Key Largo, Bertie Higgins, 101
Any Day Now, Ronnie Milsap, 103

Too Late For Goodbyes, Julian Lennon, 123.

Ian Schneider
meanspeed music
March 23, 2007

Enhanced by Zemanta